London Police Using 200 Super-recognizers: What Makes Them “super”?

Players not sold on London franchise

Thats what happened yesterday. I think he got a few in the second half. I was hoping that Nick would get a few in the first half, but were trying to keep London at 100 percent and we dont want to set him back at all. Fletcher, who the week before had struggled to shed blocks and recorded only one solo tackle and one assist while playing all 72 defensive snaps most of them no-huddle, said that he should have taken himself out of a portion of each of the first two games. He said being a guy that wants to learn from his mistakes, he willingly made way for Barnett. He added, It may be like that the rest of the season. Fletcher said, I wanted to play 100 percent, 100 miles an hour the whole ballgame and its tough to do that if youre going to play 100 percent of the snaps also. Just being smart about it, knowing, hey, Ive got a veteran guy here whos been a starter, Nick got some reps in practice so he felt comfortable in the scheme, felt comfortable with what we were doing against Detroit so it made sense to give him some playing time and I felt fresher. Fletcher, who on Sunday had eight tackles and a sack, continued, I understand that Im not 24, either. Even young guys, whether youre how old you are if you want to be 100 percent, 100 miles an hour to the football, youre not going to be able to go that mind-set 60 minutes. Its impossible to do it. I wanted to be able to run to the football better and do a lot more things than I was able to do in the first two ball games, so if that means Ive got to give Nick a few snaps, it helps me, helps us. Basically, helps us win a ball game. Ill do it. Theyre not giving out trophies for playing all the snaps. Were judged on wins and losses. Have a Redskins question? E-mail Mike Jones at mike.jones@washpost.com with the subject line Mailbag question for him to answer it in The Mailbag on Tuesday. Whats ahead: The Redskins practice at 1 p.m.

London Fletcher expects to keep sharing time with Nick Barnett

PC Paul Hyland a Metropolitan Police super-recognizer poses for photographs beside computer screens at the force’s New Scotland Yard headquarters in London on Sept. 18, 2013./ AP London police officers at Scotland Yard have reportedly been getting helped by a new breed of police-officers with special skills: “super-recognizers.” The Associated Press reported Friday that since 2011, about 200 London police officers have been recruited into an elite squad of super-recognizers that search crime surveillance photos in the hopes of identifying suspects based on perps they’d seen before. Super recognizers were responsible for nearly 30 percent of the 4,000 people who were arrested following the 2011 London riots , according to the report. “When we have an image of an unidentified criminal, I know exactly who to ask instead of sending it out to everyone and getting a bunch of false leads,” Mick Neville, Detective Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard who created the unit, told the AP. Just what exactly makes someone a super-recognizer? Richard Russell, an assistant professor of psychology at Gettysburg College in Pa., led a 2009 study that coined the phrase “super-recognizers.” He theorizes people with this superior facial recognition ability are on the other end of a spectrum from people who suffer from another condition called “face-blindness,” or prosopagnosia. In face-blindness, people have an inability to recognize familiar faces, even of celebrities and people they know well. Russell told CBSNews.com he does not believe super-recognizers are doing anything dramatically different than average people when they look at someone to recognize a familiar face. He thinks they don’t hone in on someone’s eyes or a specific feature to recognize someone better than a typical individual would, he said. “We don’t really know whether they are doing something qualitatively different than other people. I assume they are not,” said Russell. “It might be a quantitative difference — still using the same kind of processes, but maybe they’re better.” One of the goals of facial recognition research is to understand which cues are leading people to identify a face. It could be a difference in how a person processes the color contrast between the lips and skin or the distance between parts of the face that leads to this recognition, he postulated.

London Police Use Super Recognizers to Fight Crime

How does Hyland do it? Nobody knows. But since 2011, about 200 London police officers have been recruited to an elite squad of super recognizers. Officials say they have tripled the number of criminal suspects identified from surveillance photos or on the street each week, and even helped prevent some crimes like muggings, drug deals and assaults. “When we have an image of an unidentified criminal, I know exactly who to ask instead of sending it out to everyone and getting a bunch of false leads,” said Mick Neville, Detective Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard. Neville started the super recognizer unit after realizing the police had no system for identifying criminals based on images, unlike those for DNA and fingerprints. The unit proved especially valuable after riots hit London in the summer of 2011. After the violence, Scotland Yard combed through hundreds of hours of surveillance video. So far, there have been nearly 5,000 arrests; around 4,000 of those were based on police identifications of suspects from video images. The super recognizers were responsible for nearly 30 percent of the identifications, including one officer who identified almost 300 people. A facial recognition software program made only one successful identification, according to Neville.

But I dont know if we should have a franchise there. What if they have to play San Francisco — how long of a flight is that? Panthers running back Mike Tolbert : “I would rather not, but if I had to, yeah. It’s just so far from home, my family, everything I know and have grown accustomed to. It’s a nice city. I played there my rookie year [2008], but I would rather not play for a team permanently over there.” Panthers defensive end Charles Johnson : “If they paid me, of course. I haven’t been out of the country or nothing yet. I’d be up for the challenge … if they paid me.” Johnson has a six-year, $72 million deal with the Panthers. “More than I get paid here. You know what I’m saying?” Panthers wide receiver Steve Smith : “Oh, no. The relocation that is required and the travel and all that stuff, you’re constantly on the road. The time change is brutal for the physical work we do.